Rolling into Spring- Northwest Washington

We left Sekiu the morning of March 25th for our home stretch. Home being Bellingham, where our sailboat was stored “on the hard”, waiting for some TLC before going back in the water. We opted for the Highway 113 route so we could do a couple hikes along the way. First stop was Beaver Falls, which is referred to as a hike, but is really nothing more than a pull out and a few steps in the dirt to see the falls. Getting a good shot required clamoring down a hillside through the trees, but if Sadie can do it with her arthritic old legs, most anyone can. It’s a picturesque waterfall, but not an impressive hike, so unless you’re in the area… you know.

 

Washington, USA

Beaver Falls, Hwy 113, Olympic National Park

 

Marymere Falls Trail is just across the highway from Crescent Lake.  This is an easy 1.7 mile out-and-back hike through the forest, across a couple bridges and then up a steep incline to the falls. (About 300′ elevation gain). Another hike continues on from there, but we only went to the falls since we still had some roadway ahead of us. There were lots of downed trees along the trail, due to the substantial storms that effected the entire west coastal area. These trees made parts of the hike a wee bit more challenging, but not impassable. I’m sure the rangers have the trail cleared by now.

Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Merymere Falls Trail

Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Marymere Falls Trail and Barnes Creek

Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Marymere Falls

Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Moss covered tree, Marymere Falls Trail

Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Douglas squirrel, my favorite! ?

 

After our hike we continued on to Sequim, where we had a site reserved at the Dungeness Recreation Area. Here again, we had a wonderful site right on the water and couldn’t see a thing through the growth of shrubs and trees. Luckily there was a nice trail all along the waterfront (right on the other side of those trees).

We set out the next day on our bikes to ride the 5 mile trail to the Lighthouse, only to discover that bikes are not allowed. The area between the campground… all the way out Dungeness Spit… to the Lighthouse and beyond, is a National Wildlife Refuge. You can walk it, but it’s  about 10 miles round trip. A hike worth doing, I’m sure, but it didn’t fit our time frame.

Sequim, Washington, USA

Dungeness Spit and Lighthouse

Sequim, Washington, USA

Nearing sunset, Dungeness Rec Area

Sequim, Washington, USA

Sunset from Dungeness Rec Area

 

One last stop at one of our favorite places is Port Townsend. We camped there on our last night, before concluding our “winter journey” (which included last fall and early spring). We snagged a spot right on the water at Point Hudson Marina and RV Park, which I’ve enjoyed several times during my journeying. One of my stays was unintended, on my way back from the Lake Ozette hike mentioned in my last post. The storms I suffered through on that hike didn’t let up when I got off the trail. The following day the wind was blowing so hard they shut down the ferry service out of Port Townsend.

Washington, USA

Mount Baker from Port Townsend

Bald Eagle kept returning to same washed up tree trunk…

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Bald Eagle has an eye on me

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Majestic Bald Eagle and Mount Baker

 

This time around, however, we had lovely weather. While there we met up with our friend Raymond Crone. We met Raymond when he bought John’s race boat, Gizmo. In the mean time he’s added another boat to his fleet… a cute little tug named Wood Duck.  I think he’s addicted! ?

Raymond sent a text to me as he was rounding Point Hudson on his way home to Sequim, and I darted back out to the beach in time to catch Wood Duck cruising past under Mt. Baker!

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Raymond’s Wood Duck cruising by with Mount Baker in the background

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Bald Eagle, second visit, obviously a favorite spot

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Bald Eagle, third visit, and this time he brings his lunch

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Bald Eagle and his morning meal

Point Hudson, Port Townsend, Washington, USA

Bald Eagle, taking his meal and going home

 

That evening we boarded a ferry… lock, stock, and barrel (better known as Zippy and The Beast)… disembarked at Coupeville, drove north on Whidbey Island, across the incredible Deception Pass Bridge, and landed at my brother, Eric’s, house. We spent a few days regrouping and taking in some family time before moving on to Bellingham where Summer Breeze was waiting for us.

Washington State Ferries, Point Hudson, Washington, USA

Evening light from Port Townsend-Coupeville Ferry

Washington State, USA

Evening light, Admiralty Inlet

 

We gave ourselves one month to accomplish a long list of “fix it, strip it, clean it, paint it, re-wire it, install it, and figure out why it’s not working… kind of stuff”.  It was a long, and mostly wet and miserable month. We took one morning off the drive south to Mt. Vernon for Tulip Festival. For us, festival was simply finding and enjoying the beautiful tulips. Timing was not perfect, as the tulips were only starting to bloom, which they tend to do by “breed”. Only a few were starting to open. AND… the farm we landed at wouldn’t open for another hour or two. So… I played where I could… along the gardens outside the fence line. Where it didn’t seem like there was much to shoot, I got closer… as in down-on-my-knees and laying-on-the-ground, closer.

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Alpaca

USA

Tulip Festival, Mount Vernon, Washington

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip close-up #1

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip close-up #2

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip #3

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip #4

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip #5

Tulip #6

Tulip #7

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip #8

Mount Vernon, Washington, USA

Tulip #9

Tulip #10

 

So that ends our “road trip” for the season. At writing we are docked in Ganges Harbor, Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. We’re gathering provisions and attending to some last minute details before continuing north on our summer journey aboard Summer Breeze. This summer will take us to more remote places than we’ve seen before. A highlight, I’m sure, will be our northern-most destination… Haida Gwaii, formally known as Queen Charlotte Islands. Google it!

So from here on our connectivity is a great unknown. We’ll be off grid, far more than on. I’m going to do my ever-lovin’ best to keep up and share our experiences, but they’ll be hit and miss.

Thank you all, once again, for being a part of our journey. It’s always nice to have friends along for the ride!!

2 thoughts on “Rolling into Spring- Northwest Washington

  1. We absolutely loved following you guys on your “winter road trip”! The photographs were stunning (as usual 😍) and your descriptions of the areas/activities made us feel like we were there with you and John! Please come to Texas and let’s meet up… we have lots of good suggestions of “best places” in the lone star state! I know Mike and John would have a great time, and you and I can 🍷 wherever!!

    • I’m glad to know you’re still enjoying the journey with me, Susan. With “us” now. 😁

      I’d love to hear you’re ideas, and we definitely needs some catching up time. Autumn. Texas. 😜

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